Exploring resilience in families living with addiction|Homework help

Posted: January 29th, 2023

families are usually the overlooked victims. Quietly they feel and view the family imploring because of the ramifications and destructions experienced throughout these processes. I have included a pdf that touches on this very same topic.

Read the article and write a four-page; this should include two additional references to help supplement your research. Remember to use the APA format moving forward.

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Alcoholics Anonymous has groups like Al-Anon, and Al-Teens, which help family members. Many children assume this conduct or behavior as their behavior or learned behavior. I want to know your thoughts on this, and please write your feelings or ideas in your conclusion.

Thank you

1/28/23, 5:02 PM (PDF) Exploring resilience in families living with addiction

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Article PDF Available

Exploring resilience in families living with addiction

September 2011 · Journal of Primary Health Care 3(3):210-7

DOI:10.1071/HC11210 Source · PubMed

Project: Applied Research on Communication in Health (ARCH) Group

Authors:

Show all 5 authors

Abstract

Information about the impact of addiction on New Zealand (NZ) families is scarce. A good understanding of the nature and extent of family problems is essential to help families become more resilient and minimise the consequences. This study aimed to explore experiences of NZ families living with addiction, identify impacts on non-addicted family members, their coping strategies and barriers to help seeking. Literature and key stakeholder interviews informed the development of an interview schedule for 29 family participants recruited through health and social services. Interviews were recorded for analysis of central themes and critical elements that underpin those. Key stakeholders and informal informants were again consulted to discuss findings and interpretation. Addiction has widespread effects on NZ families. The coping strategies described by the participants in this project lacked the positive connotations of resilience, namely positive adaptation under significant adversity. Family impacts of addiction are complex, and similar family problems arise regardless of the substance(s) involved. This small exploratory study indicates that the implications for NZ families deserve further investigation. Future research is also required to further characterise the impact of behavioural addictions on families, addiction in particular ethnic groupings and the implications of the findings for clinical practice, other social and health services, and for public health and social policy.

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Author content

Exploring resilience in families living with addiction

QUALITATIVE RESEARCH

ORIGINAL SCIENTIFIC PAPERS

Helen Moriarty MBChB, MGP, DPH, PGCert HlthSci, PG Dip Tert Tchg; BA Hons (First Class), Maria Stubbe

DipTESL, NZ DipTCHG, MA, PhD; MBChB; Sarah Bradford Sophie Tapper Bee Teng Lim BSc, MB ChB; BA

Hons (First Class) , PG Dip Clinical Psychology, PhD

Department of Primary Health Care and General Practice, Wellington School of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Otago, Wellington, New Zealand

CORRESPONDENCE TO: Helen Moriarty Department of Primary Health Care and General Practice, Wellington School of Medicine and Health Sciences, University

of Otago, PO Box 7343, Mein Street, Wellington South, New Zealand helen.moriarty@ otago.ac.nz

J PRIM HEALTH CARE 2011;3(3):210–217.

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Information about the impact of addiction on New Zealand (NZ) families is scarce. A

good understanding of the nature and extent of family problems is essential to help families become more

resilient and minimise the consequences. This study aimed to explore experiences of NZ families living

with addiction, identify impacts on non-addicted family members, their coping strategies and barriers to

help seeking.

METHODS: Literature and key stakeholder interviews informed the development of an interview sched-

ule for 29 family participants recruited through health and social services. Interviews were recorded

for analysis of central themes and critical elements that underpin those. Key stakeholders and informal

informants were again consulted to discuss findings and interpretation.

FINDINGS: Addiction has widespread effects on NZ families. The coping strategies described by the

participants in this project lacked the positive connotations of resilience, namely positive adaptation

under significant adversity.

CONCLUSION: Family impacts of addiction are complex, and similar family problems arise regardless

of the substance(s) involved. This small exploratory study indicates that the implications for NZ families

deserve further investigation. Future research is also required to further characterise the impact of behav-

ioural addictions on families, addiction in particular ethnic groupings and the implications of the findings

for clinical practice, other social and health services, and for public health and social policy.

KEYWORDS: Qualitative research; addiction; family resilience

Introduction

Addiction prevalence in New Zealand

Alcohol, drugs and tobacco are major contributors to addiction-related morbidity and mortality, and illicit drug use has increased precipitously over

the last few decades.2 The New Zealand Alcohol and Drug Use Survey shows that nearly one in two adult (49%) aged 16–64 years have used

drugs for recreational purposes at some point in their life, and 16.6% have used drugs recreation- ally in the past year (tobacco addiction excluded).

Among these recent drug users, 34.5% reported driving a motor vehicle and 18.5% reported work- ing under the influence of drugs.3

Alcohol recreational use is even higher.4 The

2007/08 New Zealand Alcohol and Drug Use Survey shows that three in five (61.6%) drink- ers have consumed a large amount of alcohol on

at least one occasion in the past year; 6.9% of alcohol users reported harmful effects on their friendships and social lives due to their own alco-

hol use, while 16.0% of adults reported harmful effects on friendships and 8.5% on home life due to someone else’s alcohol use in the past year.5

Behavioural addictions, such as gambling and eating disorders, also create significant issues.

The 2006/07 New Zealand Health Survey found one in 58 adults (1.7%) with either problem (0.4%) or moderate risk (1.3%) gambling6, while the

 

 

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210 VOLUME 3 NUMBER 3 SEPTEMBER 2011 • • JOURNAL OF PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

VOLUME 3 NUMBER 3 SEPTEMBER 2011 • • J OURNAL OF PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

QUALITATIVE RESEARCH

ORIGINAL SCIENTIFIC PAPERS

2006/07 Gaming and Betting Activities Survey

found that 9% of adults had gambled to a harm- ful level during the last 12 months.7 Significant social, health and welfare problems can arise out

of both substance use and abuse. 8–9 The social costs of tobacco, alcohol and illicit drug use to New Zealand (NZ), including poor health,

premature death, decreased productivity, drug- attributable crime and accidents, was estimated to be NZD $2.81 to 3.71 billion.10

The role of families

Families have important roles in attracting their addicted family member into treatment and fos- tering supportive environmental change. Family

involvement can also foster better engagement of addicted individuals in treatment.11–14 Communi- ty Reinforcement and Family Training (CRAFT)

is a New Mexico programme to restructure the social, family and vocational facets of an ad- dicted individual’s life to promote and encour-

age abstinence from substance use.15–17 CRAFT reported 74% of previously resistant individuals becoming successfully engaged in treatment,

and a corresponding decrease in physical and psychological symptoms for non-addicted family members.16 That team favourably compared the

engagement six months post-intervention from CRAFT with the family self-help support group Al-Anon and other addiction treatment serv-

ices.18 However, these studies do not address the likelihood that family members may have unmet needs of their own, and the potential to improve.

SOLUTION

Resilience in families living with addiction refers to their ability to cope with and adapt to the challenges associated with a loved one’s substance use. Factors that contribute to resilience include strong family bonds, open communication, support from community and external resources, and a positive family culture.

On the other hand, risk factors for decreased resilience include poor family functioning, lack of support, and ongoing stress and trauma. Building resilience in families can involve therapy, support groups, education, and self-care.

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